Home > Activities > 2009 > Del Valle Ride

BCHC Mid Valley Unit

Del Valle Ride, February 22, 2009

Our first ride of the year, in rain and shine.
Most photos courtesy of Michael King.
You may jump to the newsletter article below the pictures.

Julie Perry, Carl Perry, Leonard Mederioa, Sandy Newsome, horses
Julie and Carl Perry, Leonard Mederioa and Sandy Newsome.


Group of people on horseback in the rain
(l-r) Debra Mason, Colton, Don Butler, Jerrie Ann Thomas, Bob Thomas, Bobby Magee, Julie Perry, Carl Perry, Bruce DeMott, Leonard Mederios, Sandy Newsome and Michael King.
(photo by Jeanette DeMott.)


Grandfather and Grandson on horses.
Colton and Grandpa Don Butler.


Carl Perry, Julie Perry, wet horses
Carl and Julie Perry.


Michael King, Sandy Newsome, wet horses
Michael King and Sandy Newsome with their faithful steeds.


Bobby Magee
Bobby Magee.


People on horseback and muleback, in the rain
Sky is grey and misting gently; grass is green, though.


Julie Perry, Leonard Mederios, Carl Perry, horses in the rain
Julie Perry, Leonard Mederios and Carl Perry.


Carl Perry
Carl Perry doesn't let a little rain dampen his spirits.


Line of horse back riders in rain at Del Valle Regional park, Livermore
Through the rain, under the oaks.


Group of back country horsemen at restaurant
Group at the restaurant afterwards.


Group of back country horsemen at restaurant
Same group, different view.




Del Valle Ride, February 2009

by Michael King

The first ride for 2009 was held at Del Valle Regional Park on February 22, rain or shine. And that is what it did: rained and shined!

Sandy Newsome had an extra horse to ride and graciously invited me to accompany him on this excursion. Before leaving, Barbara Newsome fortified us with hot coffee and juice where upon we headed out early enough to catch a bit of breakfast in Livermore.

On the road again and due to a slight error in reading the directions, we made a wrong turn just short of the park entrance. I could hear my dad, who was a WWII Army Air Corps pilot saying, "You were never lost"; rather "your position was uncertain"! After we determined that our position was certainly not where we should be, we quickly corrected our bearing and arrived at the park a little behind the group. Finding the trailhead we saddled up and rode out following tracks in the mud. When they said ride out at 10:30, they meant it!

After riding awhile in a light rain we eventually found the group just as they were finishing a snack and were turning back to the trailhead. All together there were 13 riders including Leonard Mederios, Carl and Julie Perry, Don Butler and his grandson Colton, Bob and Jerrie Ann Thomas, Debra Mason, Bruce and Jeannette DeMott, Bobby Magee, Sandy Newsome and myself. After pictures and loading up the stock, we retired to Emil Villa's Hickory Pit Restaurant in Livermore for a hot lunch and a warm dry chance to visit and laugh a bit. Leonard did not lead us astray on this restaurant, as the lunch there was excellent.

A bit of information on this park: Del Valle Park, part of the East Bay Regional Park District, is approximately 5,000 acres in size and has many miles of riding and hiking trails. The Park is also the eastern gateway to the 28-mile long Ohlone Wilderness Trail.

Being curious about the history and purpose of Lake Del Valle, I did a small amount of research. According to Wikipedia: "Lake Del Valle is an artificial lake located 5 miles south-southeast of Livermore, California on Arroyo del Valle (Spanish for "creek of the valley") in Del Valle Regional Park.

The lake and dam are part of the California State Water Project, created in 1968 as part of the South Bay Aqueduct portion of the State Water Project. The lake serves in part as off-stream storage for the South Bay Aqueduct. The capacity of the lake is 77,000 acre feet, however, the lake has a flood storage of 25,000 to 40,000 acre feet. Thus normally stores 37,000 to 52,000 acre feet.

The Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct passes below the lake, but does not connect to the lake."

"The South Bay Aqueduct is located in the eastern part of the San Francisco Bay Area. It conveys water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta through forty plus miles of pipelines and canals. It begins in north-eastern Alameda County at the California Aqueduct's Bethany Reservoir, which serves as the forebay. The pumping plant has a capacity of 330 cubic feet per second. The aqueduct flows along the eastern and southern edges of the Livermore Valley. Then through a series of tunnels to end in the foothills of eastern San Jose, CA, 5 miles from downtown.

Home  •  Activities  •  2009